MiFIR

After a multitude of articles on the policy objectives of MiFID II, the new obligations of the buy- and sell-side on research and trade reporting, and the new requirements for transparency in fixed-income markets, Thomas Murray finds itself in the position of having to see how trading begins to adapt as the Directive comes into effect at the start of the year. Specialising in post-trade infrastructures and services, its business lines are not in the immediate lines of fire of this reform – its clients are, but in other of their activities.

The authorities with whom we have spoken caution that the new shape of the EU capital markets will not take form immediately, judging from how long it took to see with any certainty recurring patterns in trading after the implementation of Regulation NMS in the US and MiFID I in the EU. We have been advised to expect a period of 12-18 months in which time the order flows and ways of execution will have settled under this new regime, assuming that this adaptation is not unduly thrown off course by world events, unforeseen technological changes, and of course economic and financial changes that would alter significantly today’s outlook on trading and investment conditions. This truly is a complex mix of variability, one which does not give even the keenest of observers a clear view ahead.

MiFID II is much discussed, and rightly so. It is a major capital markets Directive affecting a large chunk of the world’s financial system, with effects that will be felt across the world. How this will play out in a practical sense is one of the unknowns of these coming months and longer. Market professionals appreciate that its precursor, MiFID, came to have a major influence on the way capital markets trading takes place, notably in the fragmentation of Europe’s national equity markets.

And with just over three months before MiFID II comes into force at the start of January, there is indeed much hard preparatory work underway, head-scratching, confusion, repositioning of businesses, and human resources redeployment. Given the changes in trade reporting, the IT component is heavy – and it was difficulties with IT preparations that led to a one-year reprieve.

Possibly the most complex piece of capital markets legislation to hit the markets since the Dodd-Frank Act in the US in 2010 is nearly upon us, the European Union’s revamping and extending of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID I) promulgated in 2004, with effect in November 2007. That was one very long decade ago, given events in financial markets over the period.

Financial market professionals working in the EU and outside it will be affected, some heavily. Its immediate, most visible impacts are on transaction order transparency pre-trade, transaction reporting post-trade, and the separation of research from bank/broker trading commissions. The changes will likely go further: as with most rearrangements in the intricate chains of financial services, there will be knock-on effects beyond the immediate targets of the authorities, though what they will be is hard to define beforehand.

This is the fourth in a series of five thought pieces Thomas Murray wishes to share with clients this summer, the questions for our fields of expertise before the amorphous Brexit project takes shape.

In response to the 2007-2009 financial markets crises, and in line with G20 direction on restoring global economic growth, a primary objective of the European Commission was to shore up gaps in capital markets regulation wherever they were to be found.   As regards custody, the partially overlapping segments of central securities depositories and custody banks have been subject to colliding regulatory purposes and often contradictory official projects – if confusing, this is somewhat understandable given that the two domains fall between capital market and banking legislation/regulation, each subject area with its own points of view.  This still needs sorting out, and that clarification of duties and compliance will take place in the near background whilst the British exit from the EU is defined and executed.

Thomas Murray Data Services spoke to Chris Bates, chief commercial officer of Abide Financial, about the firm's activities as a reporting hub across multiple regulations and jurisdictions.

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